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Dakar Program Overview

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The special attraction of the Wells College Program in Dakar, Senegal is its focus on interaction with the local population, not as folklore but in everyday life circumstances.

Wells College offers its students, visiting students from other American colleges and universities a unique opportunity to study in Dakar, Senegal, one of the most vibrant cities in western Africa; where modern amenities mix well with the cultural tradition of the Wolof, Peul and Sérère peoples.

It is designed not only for students who want to major in African studies, but for all students wishing to develop their interest in political science, literature, history or the arts while experiencing a very different culture.

It is also a program which allows students of African American studies to discover the roots of our African heritage.

Finally, as a developing nation, Senegal offers a wonderful opportunity to examine the influence of European and American culture on traditional societies. It also gives the students a chance to look at their own culture from a very different point of view.

You can Apply to the Wells College Study Abroad Program in Dakar here. Bon Voyage and Dem Leen ak Jamm!

You can contact Dr. André Siamundele, Wells College Dakar Study Program Director, at dakar@wells.edu or call 315-364-3308 for more information.

“Dakar is an amazing city and the Wells program provides you with all the necessary tools to explore it and integrate yourself into Senegalese culture.” —M.W., UT-Dallas

Read Testimonials

“Being in Dakar was a fantastic way to improve my French while learning about a new culture in a hands on manner. I was able to explore Dakar in so many ways, through classes which gave a historical and broad perspective of the society, through my host family, which brought cultural differences into reality day after day, and through new friends who shared their life openly with me. Teranga- Senegalese hospitality- is no joke. I felt at home in Dakar after 2 months and didn't want to leave. ” —E.M., Duke University